Speakers & agenda

Oxford Symposia - 6th Annual

OLIGO 2020 OXFORD:

Antisense & Therapeutic Nucleic Acids

30-31 March, St Hilda's College, Oxford, UK

Twitter: @LPMHealthcare, #OligoOx20

Provisional Agenda

(subject to change)


Monday 30 March 2020 | Vernon Harcourt Room | South Building | St Hilda’s College | Oxford, UK


1330: Registration, welcome coffee and networking


Session 1: Oligo chemistries and tools

1430: Professor Tom Brown, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
Artificial nucleic acid backbones

1500: Miss Sarah Walsh, ATDBio Ltd and Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
Fluorogenic thiazole orange TOTFO probes stabilise parallel DNA triplexes at pH 7 and above

1520: Dr Richard Blankley, Agilent Technologies, Cheadle Royal, Cheshire, UK
Analytical tools for the characterization of synthetic oligonucleotides

1540: Refreshment break, networking, exhibition, posters

1620: Professor Elena Bichenkova, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
Towards multiple catalytic turnover: “smart”, responsive peptidyl- oligonucleotide conjugates for selective knockdown of pathogenic RNA

1650: Dr Yaroslav Y Staroseletz, Laboratory of Nucleic Acids Biochemistry, Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia
Sequence-specific cleavage of tRNAPhe with bulge-inducing peptidyl-oligonucleotide conjugates

1700:Dr Svetlana K Gaponova, Laboratory of Nucleic Acids Biochemistry, Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia
Design of chemically modified miRNases: issues of stability, catalytic activity and biological performance in tumor cells


Session 2: Oligo aptamers

1710: Dr Marcel Hollenstein, Pasteur Institute, Paris, France
Modified nucleoside triphosphates in aptamer selections

1740: Professor Bruce Sullenger, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
Aptamers as rapidly reversible antithrombotic agents

1810: Close

1900: Networking dinner (by prior booking or invitation only)


Tuesday 31 March 2020 |Vernon Harcourt Room | South Building | St Hilda’s College | Oxford, UK


0730-0900: Breakfast and accommodation checkout

Session 3: Aptamers and analytical applications of oligos

0920: Professor Larry Gold (keynote speaker), SomaLogic and University of Colorado, Boulder, USA
Human Proteomics Derived from Novel Aptamers: An Early View of Big Data and Health Applications

1000: Drs Sylvain Ladame and Rob Channon, Imperial College London, London, UK
Engineering devices for cancer diagnosis based on minimally invasive detection of microRNA biomarkers from bodily fluids

1030: Professor Nicolas Winssinger, Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Converting hybridization into chemical reactions

1100: Refreshment break, networking, exhibition, posters

1130: Professor Arwyn Jones, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK
Diving Deep Into the Endocytic Pathways of Cells to Identify Critical Factors Regulating LNP Delivery of mRNA


Session 4: Therapeutic applications of oligos

1200: Drs Simon Richardson and Benedita Feron, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, Kent, UK
The Application of a Non-transgenic, In Situ, Exosome Loading Strategy for siRNA targeting Zika Virus

1230: Refreshment break, networking, exhibition, posters

1330: Dr Guocai Zhong, Scripps Research SZBL Chemical Biology Institute, Shenzhen Bay Laboratory (SZBL), Shenzhen, Guangdong, PR China
An antisense oligonucleotide-regulated RNA switch for controllable gene therapies

1350: Professor Marina Zenkova, Laboratory of Nucleic Acids Biochemistry, Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia
Novel mesyl phosphoramidate antisense oligonucleotides efficiently silence of oncogenic microRNAs in vivo

1410: Dr Linda Popplewell, Royal Holloway-University of London, London, UK
Development of oligonucleotide therapeutics for various muscular dystrophies

1440: Dr Sara Aguti, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, UK
Exon-skipping oligonucleotides restore functional collagen VI by correcting a common COL6A1 mutation in Ullrich Muscular Dystrophy

1500: Discussion and close